Common Core Take-aways

Over the Thanksgiving break I finally got caught up on a couple of issues of School Library Journal.  In them I noticed ads for a series of webcasts they’re doing about the Common Core specifically for librarians.  Two of the three have already gone by, but I decided to register for the third in January and view the archived ones I missed.  (The link below will get you there.  You have to register in order to view the archived sessions.  Once you register you’ll get an email with the webcast link.)

I especially enjoyed the first one with Marc Aronson and Sue Bartle.  Called Getting Real it focused especially on the shift in the CCSS to more informational text.  The second dealt with how librarians can take the CCSS and use them as a way to start conversations and collaborative efforts.  Here are my takeaways from both of the sessions:

How you read shapes how you will write

The third “C” in CCSS needs to be collaboration

We need to be talking to each other (teachers and librarians) to assure that major shifts are happening

Librarians are well poised for helping kids to be active questioners

How well do I know my non-fiction collection?

The issue for kids (in reading a text) is “Do I care?”

I need to approach non-fiction in new ways–aim, approach, point of view, voice/style

Spend more time with non-fiction elements and structures

Do the “heavy lifting” for teachers–unpack the standards and show how I can help

Less content, but more meaningful learning

Process is the emphasis;  content will be learned as a result

Advertisements

Another “e”-vent!

Where are you in the transition from building a collection with mostly print materials to one with more “e” materials?  If you need help and are interested in what others in the field are saying and recommending about this shift, check here for a day-long “e” conference coming in October.  This is the third annual E-books and Beyond conference sponsored by MediaSource (the folks who bring us Junior Library Guild, SLJ, Library Journal, and the Horn Book) and offered at a low-cost for your professional development.  Team up with some of your librarian buddies, go off-site for a day and learn together!  Site licenses are available, as well as early bird discounted registration.  (Do it soon, though.  You only have ’til the end of August.)

More information about specific speakers and sessions is available here.

Image : ‘Show Me Your Library Card – downloadable+audiobooks+and+eBooks

flickr.com/photos/42437434@N00/5014437293

Are you Connected?

If you are one of those people who has heard a lot about PLNs, PLCs, nings, Twitter, etc. and you’re thinking that maybe the upcoming school year is the chance for you to dip your toes in the water so to speak, there are lots of opportunities just waiting for you!  It seems like every day I get notification of at least a couple of ways to grow as a professional and to connect with others and learn new things.  Over the next few posts I’ll share a few that sound intriguing. Here’s the first, from Lisa Schmucki (lisa@edweb.net) on behalf of edWeb:

The US Department of Education has declared August Connected Educator Month, aimed at broadening and deepening educator participation in online communities and networks while providing opportunities for education leaders to work together to move forward faster.

I hope you’ll join in this celebration of how the power of online communities can improve teaching and learning. Join in a month of online events and activities, including forums, webinars, guided tours, open houses, contests, badges, and more–sponsored by more than 60 major national education organizations, communities, and companies, including edWeb!

All of our edWeb events in August will be celebrating connected educators!  Check out the calendarand join in the many special activities being held this month.  Join our community on edWeb Connected Educators to received notices about all edWeb events.

Don’t miss the Learning 2.0 Conference!

edWeb is delighted to be a sponsor of the Learning 2.0 Conference, a free worldwide virtual event from August 20 – 24, 2012 that is being held in conjunction with Connected Educator Month.  This is a great chance to participate (and present or volunteer!) in a global conversation, with educators all over the world.  Join the conversation on rethinking teaching and learning in the age of the Internet. Subject strands include changes in the classroom, student learning, professional development, school environments, and pedagogy.

See you online!

To-do List: Part 2

Whew!  Buchlady’s been very busy;  too busy to post much recently! What I have been doing is steadily chip away on my summer to-do list.  (I have actively worked on or completed all but Instagram at this point.  Blogging keeps me accountable!)   I added a few other PD opportunities as well.  Google’s MOOC on Power Searching techniques was great.   I don’t know if the course will be archived and available again, but in the meantime here’s a helpful slideshow with many of the same tips.  Thanks for the tweet about this, @Aunty Tech!  I also attended Michelle Luhtala’s edWeb webinar about Google Apps in the library.  EdWeb archives their webinars.  Michele’s was part of their Emerging Technologies PLC and you can join the community and then search for it here.  Others are forthcoming.

Summer PD: Join Google’s MOOC!

Google recently announced an opportunity you may be interested in.  Become your school’s expert on Power Searching in Google by joining their MOOC (massive, open, online course).  The class will consist of six 50 minute sessions, some of which are interactive. The  course is free and if you complete it all Google will issue you a certificate.

Registration is open now, and the first class will be rolled out on July 10.

Monday PD: Two Libraries, One Voice!

Join SLJ Mover and Shaker John Schumacher and librarian extraordinaire Shannon M. Miller this Monday night at 8 p.m. EST for the Teacher Librarian Virtual Cafe.  They’ll be sharing their collaborative efforts around “Two Libraries, One Voice.”  Register here and you’ll get information about how to tune in to the live webinar.  Check out the other resources at TLNing while you’re there!

Great tutorial site!

I don’t know about you, but (especially) when it comes to technology, I learn best by watching someone else use a tool, and then trying it myself.  I have learned a lot from UK tech and ELL guru Russell Stannard at his site.  Full of teacher-training videos done as screencasts using Camtasia software, Russell walks you through a web tool and shares how you might use it with students.

I’ve learned the ins and outs of Glogster, Voki, Twitter, and mybrainshark from Russell’s videos, to name a few.  It’s easy to search his site, and once you’re “in” one of his trainings it’s easy to go back and see/hear one part again by clicking on the slides in the sidebar.

What’s your favorite way to explore a new tool?  What’s your favorite new tool?  Please share!

Previous Older Entries